Predictable

Retailer offends national patriotic sensibilities by applying to open on ANZAC day.

Everyone else leaps to use the incident to bignote themselves – politicians compete to condemn it the most, competing retailers say they’d never consider doing something like that (although if the retailer had gotten away with it without too much comment, you can bet they’d have all done the same), and the RSL gets to sound relevant for a few moments.

Retailer backs off.

It’s a slow news week.

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47 responses to “Predictable

  1. Personally I don’t believe any day is sacrosanct.

    Shops should be able to open any day of the year without being dictated to by governments.

  2. And Abbott telling us the other day that he feared the national curriculum had succumbed to political correctness when it was reported that kids would learn about Sorry Day as well as ANZAC day. Of course ANZAC day is *never* PC’d, is it Tone?

  3. How dare you impugn ANZAC day! If you don’t like this country, why don’t you leave it?

  4. Shops are closed for other big religious festivals (eg. Christmas, Easter), so perhaps they should be closed for this festival too.

  5. See – there’s more justification for ANZAC day, in that at least the soldiers represent all of us. Fewer of us are Christians than benefit from the country being stable.

  6. our courageous diggers fought on the beaches of gallipoli for the glory of King George V and empire.

    defeating the dreaded Kaiser Wilhelm II (his cousin), its a day of great relevance .

    by royal decree, no one is allowed to buy chinese Kmart toys on this day. let ye shoppes remain closed for a thousand years to honor this victory!

  7. My local shop is open on christmas day, closing at 1pm. The sky does not fall in, nor does the community even bat an eyelid. Basically my view is that it should be a choice that individual retailers make in determining how best to serve their customer base. This OTT political correctness that seems to suggest The Fallen will be turning in their graves with indignity at the prospect of shopping before lunchtime on ANZAC day is just pre-Englightenment style nonsense.

  8. Not wanting to be pedantic Karl, but we lost at Gallipoli….

    I think Kmart are pushing the envelope a little by suggesting that by them not being allowed to open means

    “Customers who are used to being able to shop at any time would potentially be severely inconvenienced by our closure. In short, they would not be able to obtain necessity items when they want.”

    I’m not convinced that Kmart sells any “necessities” that customers couldn’t live without until after 1pm in the afternoon, but, having said that – and I think I am as observant of the meaning and importance of ANZAC day as anyone – pubs and petrol stations are allowed to open as normal so I don’t see any real issue with any retailer being able to do so – provided staff were given the option of working on a voluntary basis.

  9. They gave their lives for a temporary shopping respite observed annually, and you mock their sacrifice. Shameless.

    It’s almost not worth them having gone to fight other people in Turkey for obscure reasons at all.

  10. pubs and petrol stations are allowed to open as normal

    Actually pubs *are* open in the am! So effectively you can get pissed at 10am on ANZAC day, but you can’t buy a bra?

  11. It’s what the diggers fought for. Also my right to use their sacrifice for my political advantage.

  12. Yeah, the Good ole Aussie Blokey Spirit. It was Howard who politicised ANZAC day wasn’t it? I don’t remember it being the huge event that it is now – before it used to mostly be the veterans and their families, now it’s like a religious experience where people take ‘pilgrimages’ to ‘sacred earth’ of past battlefields, regardless of whether they had ancestors fight in the war or not. And the rest of us are made to feel guilty if we want to do other things on ANZAC morning – like shop.

  13. In the long march through the institutions all artifacts of bourgeois culture must be removed. It is important to recognise that the cultural transmission of values re-creates decadent society in every generation. When we see this, we can then clearly see that those institutions must be destroyed. It will not be possible to destroy them all at once, but slowly the long march through the institutions must succeed. Every chip at this corrupt edifice is a step towards the New World Order.

    Until the people realise the corrupt, racist, sexist, oppressive nature of their society, until they loathe the very essence of what it has become, they will not be prepared to destroy it. False consciousness will prevail until we destroy the institutions that allow people to feel secure in this organized barbarity we call civilization, institutions such as family, religion and freedom of contract. These things must be mocked and critiqued out of existence.

    It may seem paradoxical to support those engines of consumer lust such as shops, malls and supermarkets, but this is a step on the way. The next phase is to convince those imperialist stooges, the military to relive the glory days of war by looting the stores and raping and killing the employees. Then people will understand the truly evil nature of war.

    When people understand both that their society is corrupt and not worth defending, and that defense of their society is evil in itself, the New World Order will be upon them.

  14. Must be more than a slow news week if I’m agreeing with you on yet another issue!

  15. You’re a funny fellow, SB.

  16. confessions

    Some days I really worry about SB’s state of mind.

    😉

  17. To quote Jeremy: “It’s a slow news week.”

  18. Could someone explain to me why the battle of Gallipoli is so revered in our culture, given that it was, to be concise, Australian soldiers being cut to pieces by enemy fire because the officers in charge gave less of a stuff about us than Field Marshall Haig?

  19. Off the top of my head, I think it’s because it’s the first time we fought as an “independent” nation.

  20. Michael Hudson

    Now if Kmart had expressed the desire to dramatically reduce prices for the day in order to start a price war that would make customers battle one another to be the first to get into stores to snap up the bargains…

  21. Pingback: Let The Price War Begin! « Michael Hudson

  22. Pingback: Let The War Begin! « Michael Hudson

  23. Good thing SB writes the odd comment otherwise we’d all just sit around shaking each other by the hand and congratulating ourselves on how *right* we are.

  24. Doesn’t sound like any of the comment threads on this site, Greg.

  25. “Could someone explain to me why the battle of Gallipoli is so revered in our culture,”

    http://www.awm.gov.au/commemoration/anzac/anzac_tradition.asp

  26. I see that link doesn’t mention British soldiers, more British were killed and wounded than ANZACS. I guess the British don’t like to remember their defeats.

    As I understand it Gallipoli is revered in ANZAC culture because of myths.

  27. Kill the culture, forward the revolution.

  28. I don’t revere any particular war. In fact, I think Gallipoli is a tragic waste of human life. But I am proud of my grandfathers, who fought in North Africa, PNG and Europe. My uncle fought in Vietnam. It clearly affected him deeply as he now teaches in Hanoi.

    I don’t think asking retailers to keep shut for half a day is too much to ask to show a little respect. And it should be extended to other non-essential services.

  29. “Personally I don’t believe any day is sacrosanct. “

    I’m with you chinda63, what may be significant for some may have no relevance whatsoever for others, when people bellyache about opening on Good Friday, some make the erroneous claim that we’re a Christian country, this is patently FALSE!

    I say scrap public holidays and just give us all extra annual leave, we can then decide what is and isn’t significant.

  30. Hi Rob,

    The link I provided is mainly talking about the importance and meaning of ANZAC day to Australians and New Zealanders, I think that’s probably why it doesn’t mention the British.

    The French lost a fair few there too.

    “As I understand it Gallipoli is revered in ANZAC culture because of myths.”

    I think you might be being a little harsh there.

    It’s revered in our culture as a symbol of the sacrifice of our troops who were acting for the first time as an independent Australian and New Zealand force rather than just as part of the British army.

  31. [“As I understand it Gallipoli is revered in ANZAC culture because of myths.”

    I think you might be being a little harsh there.]

    Well, there are a lot of myths, like the Aussies were bigger soldiers than the Brits (they weren’t) and whilst every other nationality was in chaos on the beach because their officers had died the Aussies stood apart, organised and brave!

    I just think it’s strange that such a useless massacre is revered. The ‘sacrifice’ was an obscene waste of life.

  32. “It’s revered in our culture as a symbol of the sacrifice of our troops who were acting for the first time as an independent Australian and New Zealand force rather than just as part of the British army.”

    For what it’s worth they were still doing the bidding of a foreign power, so much for independence.

  33. “Well, there are a lot of myths, like the Aussies were bigger soldiers than the Brits…”

    I think we have to allow for a bit of poetic license (and patriotism) from the times, given it was a war situation — it’s not unusual for writers to go a bit over the top in extolling the virtues of their side’s soldiers.

    “I just think it’s strange that such a useless massacre is revered. The ’sacrifice’ was an obscene waste of life.”

    As it turned out it was a waste, but the theory of the plan was good — unfortuneately the execution was a balls-up.

    “For what it’s worth they were still doing the bidding of a foreign power, so much for independence.”

    You’re suggesting Australia shouldn’t have got involved in WW1 ?

  34. “(and patriotism) ”

    Heh – You know my views on patriotism 😉

    “You’re suggesting Australia shouldn’t have got involved in WW1 ?”

    Absolutely – Nobody should have got involved in the clusterfuck that was the ‘great’ war.

  35. “Well, there are a lot of myths, like the Aussies were bigger soldiers than the Brits…”

    There is always a kernal of truth in these things RobJ.

    For example, Aussie troops apparently took more prisoners and had a higher kill ratio that the Brits in WW1.

    Not because we are better at killin’ folk than the Brits, but because we were used as shock troops.

    First in, best dressed and all.

    It also wouldn’t suprise me if the Aussie’s were a little bigger, as we were still a mostly rural population.

    Fresh air, lots of red meat and hard physical work can have a marvelous effect on a growing lad!

  36. There is always a kernal of truth in these things RobJ.

    That would be ‘colonel’ of truth then? 😀

  37. My mistake! 🙂

  38. Hey Duncan, I can’t be bothered trawling Google, My claims that Aussies were bigger and more organised without officers ware derived from a Lateline show from a few years ago, a special edition about the myths and legends of Gallipoli – the transcript will still be there.

    Sorry if I appear to want to get into a pissing match between Au and UK soldiers, it isn’t my intent.

  39. “Fresh air, lots of red meat and hard physical work can have a marvelous effect on a growing lad!”

    I dunno about WWI but for WWII AU & NZ had rationing for longer than the UK and back then everybody (working class – the ones that did the fighting and dying) worked hard.

  40. This is the Lateline I was referring to:

    http://www.abc.net.au/lateline/stories/s281903.htm

  41. “Sorry if I appear to want to get into a pissing match between Au and UK soldiers, it isn’t my intent.”

    Me neither mate, just thinking out loud.

    “The working class – the ones that did the fighting and dying worked hard.”

    Absolutely.

  42. Looks interesting.

    Thanks, I’ll give it a read.

  43. It’s good, there are two points of view, the one I’ve been espousing could be wrong.

  44. “Heh – You know my views on patriotism ”

    Yes I do and I have no real argument with you there — but we should also consider that we are talking about the attitudes of people, (not only here but all around the world), nearly 100 years ago and in those days generally speaking people were far more patriotic than most are today. Also remembering that patriotism is a pretty strong motivational force for a population at war.

    “Absolutely – Nobody should have got involved in the clusterfuck that was the ‘great’ war.”

    It probably should never have started but I think in the political climate of the day it was always going to happen and once it did, Australia and all of the other Commonwealth countries were always going to support England when the call came, after all in those days most Australians still considered England as the “home country”.

    The real point of ANZAC Day is that the Gallipoli campaign and its aftermath was the turning point for Australia, it was after that that our Government started to assert itself and decided that Australian troops would operate under Australian command — hence the Australian Corps commanded by Monash in France.

    Of course, and I should have mentioned in my original post — ANZAC Day is also the day we remember all of our war dead — not just the Gallipoli campaign.

    ““Well, there are a lot of myths, like the Aussies were bigger soldiers than the Brits…”

    I’m not sure but I think the idea that Australian troops in general were physically bigger than the Brits may have come about because the Light Horse regiments and, pre-war, the regular infantry units of our army were manned by volunteers who had to meet a minimum height requirement, and the troops initially at Gallipoli would have come from these early formed units, therefore they probably were on average bigger than the troops from other countries who had been fighting for some time at that point and had dropped height requirements in an effort to get as many rifles on the front line as possible…

    Later of course our regular infantry dropped minimum height requirements, but I’m not sure if the Light Horse did.

  45. Sorry Gavin, I’ve been spending time in the other thread..

    “Of course, and I should have mentioned in my original post — ANZAC Day is also the day we remember all of our war dead —”

    Fair call – though I would point out that we also (myself included) observe Remembrance Day

    “I’m not sure but I think the idea that Australian troops in general were physically bigger than the Brits may have come about because the Light Horse regiments and, pre-war, the regular infantry units of our army were manned by volunteers who had to meet a minimum height requirement,”

    Again, another good point that passed me by, check out the link I left to that Lateline transcript, you’ll like it.

  46. Thanks for the link Rob, it does make interesting reading — I think there’s no doubt that the ANZAC image has been over-exaggerated at times, but on the other hand, I reckon their combat record and list of achievements really do speak for themselves and need no embellishment.

  47. Richard Ryan

    And Piers Akerman speaks ill of the living, just ask Mr. Habib!

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