Mr 1.8% wants to gag 7.8%

Senator Fielding is demanding that Parliament gag the Greens when the US President comes to visit later this year.

House of Representatives votes received by Family First cf Australian Greens in 2004: 235,315 vs 841,734.
Total Senate votes received by Family First cf Australian Greens in 2004: 210,567 vs 916,431.

Total House of Representatives votes received by Family First cf Australian Greens in 2007: 246,798 vs 967,789.
Total Senate votes received by Family First cf Australian Greens in 2007: 204,788 vs 1,144,751.

Dear Steve – why do you hate Australian democracy so much? (Apart from the fact that it hates you, obviously.)

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79 responses to “Mr 1.8% wants to gag 7.8%

  1. [quote]”Maybe the motion should read that we gag them from being absolutely idiotic”[/quote]
    Gagging politicians from being absolutely idiotic sounds like an excellent idea to me. Give the Greens a lot more time to speak.

  2. For goodness sake, let him rant. It’s pure gold every time he opens his mouth. He can dig his own grave.

  3. To have found for AFACT would have required judicial creativity. There is no obligation in the current law for an ISP to be liable for the actions of its customers.

  4. Once the vote is counted Jeremy a seat is a seat.

    Otherwise Julia Gillard 65.5%

    trumps

    Kevin Rudd 62.3%

    and

    Wilson Tuckey 66.6% t

    rumps them both.

  5. 18 months to go until Fuckwit Fielding disappears into irrelevence. Assuming we don’t get a DD election.

  6. Well, loe, it’s highly doubtful that many ALP voters realised that by putting 1 above the line they’d be preferencing Fielding ahead of the Greens, and we’re not talking a minor differences between MPs all on about 65%, we’re talking about the Greens getting more than FOUR TIMES the primary vote of fundies first, but, okay… if you want to talk seats, the multiple is even higher – the Greens have five senators, fundies first one.

    It’s an absurdity for Steven “thank god for the incompetence of the ALP” Fielding to talk about “gagging” a much, much more popular party than his own.

  7. 18 months to go until Fuckwit Fielding disappears into irrelevence. Assuming we don’t get a DD election.

    And assuming the power-brokers of the ALP right don’t get their way to preference a fundie again. Will the ALP shoot itself in the foot again I wonder?

  8. “And assuming the power-brokers of the ALP right don’t get their way to preference a fundie again. Will the ALP shoot itself in the foot again I wonder?”

    Possibly, the ALP are pricks and hate the Greens so much they’d rather give the balance of power to a person like Fielding.

    confessions, I’ll ask you again, don’t vote Labor, they do not deserve your vote.

  9. I don’t think the Greens need gagging for Obama’s speech. I’m sure that, like fellow leftist Chris Matthews, they will be able to forget Obama is black for an hour.

  10. “Possibly, the ALP are pricks and hate the Greens so much they’d rather give the balance of power to a person like Fielding.”

    You know what? If the ALP *does* pull that preference shit this time, I am putting them below the Liberals.

  11. Rob: as I understand it preferencing FF was about trying to maximise the Labor senate vote over the Liberals. A massive fuck up that serves the party right for what it ended up with. Unfortunately according to Antony Green’s election calculator, FF do better in a DD and thus increase their chances of retaining their senate spot, depending on preferences. My guess is Fielding knows he’s screwed up with Labor so is hoping for the Liberals preferences.

    I never vote below the line in the Senate so don’t really feel I can complain about the senators we do end up with. But not being a Victorian I feel vindicated to complain all I like about Fielding. 😛 lol.

  12. I dunno, Jeremy. Preferencing Lib over Labor is one thing, but if Abbott is Opposition Leader I’d be preferencing Labor even if Conroy was PM.

    Of course, come the 2013 election with Hockey or Turnbull as Lib leader, it would be an entirely different story.

  13. “Will the ALP shoot itself in the foot again I wonder?”
    As I see it the ALP continue to shoot itself in the foot…just think
    NSW Labor – a disaster
    Vic Labor- stagger from one infrastructure debacle to another
    Qld Labor – well on the nose
    South australian Labor – Atkinson
    Federal Labor – Conroy

  14. Rob: as I understand it preferencing FF was about trying to maximise the Labor senate vote over the Liberals. .

    You’re probably right confessions, but they do hate the Greens, they even rolled out Garrett in the last state election (Vic) to campaign against them.

    OK, maybe they don’t hate them, they fear them because let’s face it, if you’re a lefty then your views are far more likely to be represented by the Greens than the ALP.

    Jeremy, I live in Roxon’s seat so I might just put the Liberals ahead of Labor anyway, let’s face it they’re never going to win in the West.

    At a state level I’m tempted because I don’t like our state govt, OK I don’t like any govt but I really dislike the Brumby/Bracks admin. Whatever happens neither major party will be near the top of my selection.

    Bryan, what you say is true but I still think that most Aussies see the Liberals as a bit of a flip-flopping rabble and a hopeless opposition.

  15. thevoiceofreason

    The problem with Liberal and the ALP is they panda too much to big business. The greens are the only party prepared to fight for stronger regulations so these companies dont implode on their own greed. The greens fight for long term financial sustainabilty whereas self interested business leaders want short term profits with bonuses attached.

    Look how the right have managed to fuck a entire worldwide financial system in massively short time requiring mum and dad’s to bail it out FFS.

    Ironic as it is to many narrow thinkers the Greens in power would see a far more stable business conditions.

  16. [Ironic as it is to many narrow thinkers the Greens in power would see a far more stable business conditions.]

    That’s what I reckon, they’re champions of sustainability, something rampant capitalist just don’t understand.

  17. D’oh!!! I keep forgetting which site I’m on [ ]

  18. Rob: it is the word blockquote, and /blockquote encased within the brackets!

  19. Oh!

    That’s the greater than and less than signs. Fucking wordpress!

  20. it is the word blockquote, and /blockquote encased within the brackets!

    Yeah, got me on the first comment…

    Fucking wordpress!

    … and my own blog is on wordpress!

  21. I just tried that and it didn’t work.

    See

  22. But did that time – sorry for experimenting Jeremy.

  23. It’s just ordinary html. Within the greater and less than signs you can use “i” and “/i” for italics, b for bold, etc.

    Anyway, back to the topic…

  24. Jeremy that’s how democracy works.
    If ALP voters are too apathetic to know that their party’s preferences will return then they deserve the result they have. If they don’t want to be led by the party they have the option as I did, to number every box below the line.
    Independant voting has its merrits.

  25. bob brown heckling bush over the hideous events at guantanamo bay is someone “being absolutely idiotic”, according to fielding.

    maybe instead of gagging the greens he could recommend a good parliamentary waterboarding?

    that prison is still open and torturing btw…
    CHANGE YOU CAN BELIEVE IN

  26. Brown heckling Bush was childish. If he wanted a wank he should have just ducked out to the can.

  27. Brown heckling Bush was childish

    Are you saying nobody should ever heckle anyone?

    If anyone is deserving of being Heckled surely it would be Bush. I say Brown was brave to heckle the most powerful (and possibly dangerous) man in the world.

    And for Fielding to call Brown idiotic? Brown comes across as an intelligent person, Fielding? Isn’t he a creationist?

  28. “If anyone is deserving of being Heckled surely it would be Bush. I say Brown was brave to heckle the most powerful (and possibly dangerous) man in the world.”

    Brave ??
    Do you think Bush would set his CIA minders onto Brown or something Rob ?

    What Brown’s outburst really was, was rude, ignorant grandstanding completely inappropriate for that forum and an example of exactly the reason why the Greens get only 7.8% of the vote.

    And to top it off at the end of the session Brown showed a typical politician’s hypocrisy by attempting to shake Bush’s hand.

  29. “Do you think Bush would set his CIA minders onto Brown or something Rob “

    Well, the Libs and Labor did make sure he was banned from parliament the next day so the Chinese premier’s visit would be without inconvenient incident.

    Apparently the major parties and the Americans think that their President should be able to address our parliament without any criticism whatsoever. They arranged for the protesters to be kept out of sight of the Presidential motorcade, down behind a hill. They did not allow the Greens or anyone to address any issues of concern to Australians.

    As for 7.8% of the vote – I think you’ll find that in criticising Bush over the Iraq War, the Greens were representing far more than than their actual voters.

  30. Leo –

    “Jeremy that’s how democracy works.”

    No, that’s now tricky voting systems designed to take power away from voters work.

    Voters are given the crappy options of numbering all 80 or so boxes below the line, or numbering 1 above the line.

    They should – if the aim is for their vote to represent their actual intention – be able to preference parties above the line, as the Greens regularly propose and the major parties regularly obstruct.

    “If ALP voters are too apathetic to know that their party’s preferences will return then they deserve the result they have.”

    To quote Arthur Dent, “You hadn’t exactly gone out of your way to draw attention to them had you? You know, like telling anybody, or anything.”

    ” If they don’t want to be led by the party they have the option as I did, to number every box below the line. Independant voting has its merrits.”

    Just because people aren’t in the tiny percentage of dedicated voters who are prepared to do that, doesn’t mean their preferences should be cynically stolen.

  31. Apparently Brown thinks the rules of decorum do not apply to him when he has his knickers in a knot.

  32. Apparently the major party politicians think the rules of free speech don’t apply when there’s a US – or, for that matter, Chinese – leader to suck up to.

  33. Free speech does not include the right to shout down foreign heads of state when they address parliament. Brown is perfectly free to make his own comments when he has the floor in parliament.

    Shouting people down is the opposite of free speech. It is denying others the right to speak.

  34. “Shout down” indeed. “Denying others the right to speak”. What utter garbage. That’s not what happened – well, not what the Greens did, anyway.

    I love the irony of you using the expression “Denying others the right to speak” when you’re defending Mr 1.8%’s proposal to do just that.

  35. Hello Jeremy

    “Well, the Libs and Labor did make sure he was banned from parliament so the Chinese premier’s visit would be without inconvenient incident.”

    I’d suggest thast Bush himself had nothing to do with that decision.

    “Apparently the major parties and the Americans think that their President should be able to address our parliament without any criticism whatsoever.”

    Bush was invited as a guest speaker to address our parliament, it wasn’t meant to be a forum for holding a debate, and to interrupt anyone while they are speaking is unacceptably rude — my kids understood that by the time they were 5 or 6.

    “As for 7.8% of the vote – I think you’ll find that in criticising Bush over the Iraq War, the Greens were representing far more than than their actual voters.”

    This is without doubt true — but doesn’t alter any of what I’ve stated.

  36. “Bush was invited as a guest speaker…”

    By the major parties.

    ” to address our parliament, it wasn’t meant to be a forum for holding a debate,”

    Actually, that’s precisely what our parliament is for.

    ” and to interrupt anyone while they are speaking is unacceptably rude”

    If that person’s going to do you the courtesy of giving you a chance to respond, yes. If not, no.

  37. It doesn’t make any difference who invited him Jeremy, he was here as a guest.

    Do you treat guests at your house with less respect if your partner invites them rather than yourself ?

    “Actually, that’s precisely what our parliament is for.”

    Yes, when the normal “business” of party politics is being conducted, not when an invited guest is addressing it.

    “If that person’s going to do you the courtesy of giving you a chance to respond, yes. If not, no.”

    Clearly your interpretation of good manners is different to mine.

  38. Do you think Bush would set his CIA minders onto Brown or something Rob ?
    No! But he did get pilloried for his actions by loads of other politicians.

    What Brown’s outburst really was, was rude, ignorant grandstanding completely inappropriate for that forum and an example of exactly the reason why the Greens get only 7.8% of the vote.

    What can I say, he speaks for me, Bush started two wars of choice, the guy is a prick!

    “Apparently Brown thinks the rules of decorum do not apply to him when he has his knickers in a knot.’

    Which politician does? Do you listen to them on the radio?

  39. Do you treat guests at your house with less respect if your partner invites them rather than yourself ?

    I would if it were Bush, then i’d divorce my wife because clearly we just wouldn’t be compatible. Respect isn’t automatic Gavin, not for me anyway.

  40. “Do you treat guests at your house with less respect if your partner invites them rather than yourself ?”

    If she invited someone who’d started a war based on utter lies around to lecture me, and expected me to sit silently until he left, then yes, I would.

  41. Oh yeah, Respect the Office of the PoTUS? Nope! Americans can, they’re not my govt, I don’t get a say, it doesn’t automatically earn my respect.

    What if it were Mugabe? You can argue there is no comparison but Bush has a LOT of blood on his hands because of what amounted to lies.

  42. Sorry to bang on about this Gavin but the respect side of it is bullshit, otherwise you would respect Bob Brown’s right to protest as a democratically elected representative. Personally I respect the man (well, more than I do other politicians)

  43. “I would if it were Bush, then i’d divorce my wife because clearly we just wouldn’t be compatible.

    You’d probably have fair grounds to do so too 😉

    Respect isn’t automatic Gavin, not for me anyway.”

    Respect isn’t automatic Rob, you are correct — but manners should be.

    We are talking about leaders of nations and diplomacy here, the etiquette of international politics demands that our politicians particularly, show respect to leaders of other countries when they are invited here as guests.

    “Bush started two wars of choice, the guy is a prick!”

    Wasn’t Afghanistan supported by the majority of people here and in the NATO countries that are involved ? To be honest I can’t remember, but I think it was.

  44. Stolen?
    Seriously Jeremy. Paranoia is a treatable afliction you know. Or is everyone REALLY out to get you?

    The ALP made it perfectly clear at the last election who their preferences were to go to. I can’t promise you, but I think I still have an ALP senate how to vote slip at home and some other ALF documentation on how the placement of a 1 above the line would pan out as a vote.
    I’m sure that you don’t agree with the placeament of all 80 of the preferences of the Greens at the last election so I am sure that you voted below the line too as I did.
    If you want to leave all of the hard work to the party you have a moral obligation to know exactly how the avove line vote will pan out. If you don’t and it isn’t what you wanted then you have no place arguing here.
    In a cricket game the wicket keeper and the bowler simply say to the Batsman who’s been given out “Tell your story walking!”
    Once a candidate has been selected by the electorate to represent them in the senate, then the number of votes that he/she got in gaining that seat is no longer relevent except in doing analysis as to how well he/she might do in the next election.
    Any other grapes are simply sour.

  45. Brown had the opportunity to respond when next he had the floor in parliament. He could have tabled a resolution, or merely called a press conference.

    The problem is that infantile leftists are so full of their own self-righteousness that they feel entitled to throw a tantrum whenever they are contradicted. Neither manners, nor the rules of the house, nor respect for others can stay their wanking hand.

  46. Wasn’t Afghanistan supported by the majority of people here and in the NATO countries that are involved ? To be honest I can’t remember, but I think it was.

    It was still a war of choice, and it turned out to be a clusterfuck!

  47. The problem is that infantile leftists are so full of their own self-righteousness that they feel entitled to throw a tantrum whenever they are contradicted. Neither manners, nor the rules of the house, nor respect for others can stay their wanking hand.

    What a respectful, polite rant! 😉

  48. “What if it were Mugabe? ”

    Regardless of my personal opinions of him, if he was invited here as a guest of our government as Bush was, I’d expect our politicians to treat him with the same respect as any other international leader..

    That’s not to say they have to agree with him, but I would expect them not to be shouting interruptions while he speaks.

    “otherwise you would respect Bob Brown’s right to protest as a democratically elected representative. ..”

    Yes I would — but he can do so without interrupting, I’m sure Bush’s speech would’ve finished at some point, at which time Brown could feel free to shout whatever he liked.

    The point is, Brown did what he did to grab the attention of the media — pure and simple grandstanding.

  49. invasions dont get legitimacy from opinion polls of the aggressor nation

  50. “Brown had the opportunity to respond when next he had the floor in parliament. “

    LOL. After Bush had gone. Yup, that’s “debate” for the ALP and Liberals – you can have your say, later. When it doesn’t matter.

    “The ALP made it perfectly clear at the last election who their preferences were to go to.”

    Utter bullshit. The vast majority of ALP voters had no idea their preferences were going to fundies first.

  51. Afghanistan allowed itself to be used as a command and control centre for attacks on the US. Invading it was legitimate.

  52. invasions dont get legitimacy from opinion polls of the aggressor nation

    Good point karl.

    The support was basically a rush of blood to the head after 9/11, after all France and Germany went there but wouldn’t fight. I wonder what the polls would say now and would the pollies pay any attention if the public said ‘withdraw’?

  53. Jeremy Bush wasn’t there for a debate. He was there to address parliament.

  54. Afghanistan allowed itself to be used as a command and control centre for attacks on the US. Invading it was legitimate.

    Going after Bin Laden may have been legitimate. Regardless it was still a war of choice and they fucked it up! Nine years on they finally realised, Oh, we better talk to the Taliban. (I could’ve told them that). And before we get off Bush, it was him who took his eye off the ball and went to Iraq, like I say he’s a prick, feel free to respect him, I can’t!

  55. Jeremy Bush wasn’t there for a debate. He was there to address parliament

    At the time Bush couldn’t have debated if he wanted to.

  56. “The ALP made it perfectly clear at the last election who their preferences were to go to.”

    Utter bullshit. The vast majority of ALP voters had no idea their preferences were going to fundies first.

    Yeah, I missed the full page ads too!

  57. “invasions dont get legitimacy from opinion polls of the aggressor nation”

    They do in democratic nations Karl, because governments rarely embark on them if they don’t have popular support, and given that the Afghan government was allowing Al Quaeda to operate from its soil, there could be some debate as to who the aggressor actually was.

  58. “like I say he’s a prick, feel free to respect him, I can’t!”

    You still don’t get it do you Rob — it’s not a question of you and I respecting him…It’s a question of diplomatic etiquette that is supposed to be shown by politicians to all world leaders.

  59. Gavin, I do get it and I admire Bob Brown for breaking with stupid conventions and heckling the prick. Just because I don’t agree doesn’t mean I don’t understand.

  60. “They do in democratic nations Karl, because governments rarely embark on them if they don’t have popular support, ”

    So I’m sure public opinion is now against the Afghanistan attempted occupation, why aren’t they withdrawing? Why did Au and UK go to Iraq? The biggest war since the last Iraq invasion?

    Karl is spot on. (IMO)

  61. Jeremy Bush wasn’t there for a debate. He was there to address parliament.

    What a waste of money, he should have teleconferenced (as should of Cheney – closing motorways to accommodate a total prick who supports torture).

  62. “So I’m sure public opinion is now against the Afghanistan attempted occupation, why aren’t they withdrawing?”

    Trying to prevent the place from descending into civil war ?

    Trying to stabilise the government to prevent the Taliban from retaking power ?

    I don’t know — but I imagine they could be 2 possibilities.

    “Why did Au and UK go to Iraq?’

    Because we are allies of the US ?

    Because Howard and Blair thought there might be some money in it ?

    Because they were duped by the intelligence reports and believed that Hussein’s WMD’s existed ?

    Take your pick…

    “The biggest war since the last Iraq invasion?

    Do you mean Kuwait ?

    “Gavin, I do get it and I admire Bob Brown ..”

    I’m sorry your expectations of our politicians are so low, Rob — but then again, your admiration for him seems to be shared by only around 8% of the voting public…

    “What a waste of money, he should have teleconferenced ”

    You’re not seriously contending that we shouldn’t have international leaders visit our shores in person are you Rob ?

  63. That’s because the vast majority of ALP voters were simply Howard out voters Jeremy and they were not politically savy enough to inform themselves correctly.
    Surely, the electoral act states that the ALP has to publish their preference intentions and I’ve heard nothing of them being prosecuted for a breach of that law.
    Sounds like a loser’s hissy fit to me Jeremy.

  64. You won’t win that fight in the current hysterical environment of ‘left-wing media bias’. To be honest, it’s already lost.

    OK I have to show my hand, I personally don’t think we should be withdrawing, I was in two minds at the beginning but with the benefit of hindsight I think we were wrong to invade.

    Now that we’re there then we have a responsibility to do our best, ie I support the surge, I support the idea of paying people to stop fighting for or siding with the Taleban, I’m heartened to hear that a senior US general is insisting that all troops deployed learn 200 words of Dari and one person per platoon to study it intensively, ie I think the penny has finally dropped with the US that they must win the ‘hearts and minds’ war, however my point being that wars shouldn’t be poll driven, they should be a last resort.

    Because we are allies of the US ?

    I understand this, my question was rhetorical, ie the invasion had bugger all to do with public opinion, nor should it have.

    Do you mean Kuwait ?

    The coalition never invaded Kuwait, I’m talking about Bush Jnrs Iraq War.

    I’m sorry your expectations of our politicians are so low, Rob — but then again, your admiration for him seems to be shared by only around 8% of the voting public…

    So, I’ve never been a sheep, I don’t buy the Sun, though it’s the most popular paper in Au, I don’t watch ACA or TT and they have higher ratings than the shows I watch in that timeslot. I’m proud to be my own man, to think independently and not give a toss about the majority view if I don’t agree with it, ie I’m not scared to speak my mind.

    You’re not seriously contending that we shouldn’t have international leaders visit our shores in person are you Rob ?

    Nah, it was a flippant smart arse comment, you know me. Have a great weekend Gavin.

  65. Ooops I pasted from PP.. I was supposed to paste:

    “Trying to prevent the place from descending into civil war ?

    Trying to stabilise the government to prevent the Taliban from retaking power ?”

  66. Respect Australia. Return the Australians to this nation for justice and if you respect the world’s laws, the world will respect you.

    That’s what Bob Brown called out to Bush.
    He was talking about justice for Hicks and Habib.

    From where I stand, Bob Brown is an Australian hero.
    Both Labor and Liberal were willing to jettison the rule of law for Australian citizens in order to appease a frenzied and wounded beast.
    Brown stood up to a tyrant when all the other sycophants stayed silent.

    BTW, did you know that Mamdouh Habib’s son was in the visitor’s gallery during the Bush address? He was there at the invitation of Bob Brown.
    Did you also know that the young lad was ejected from the chamber?
    So piss weak was Australian democracy under Howard that casting an eye on the man that illegally imprisoned your father was enough to have you declared persona non grata and ejected from Parliament.

    By speaking out, Bob Brown was standing up for the rule of law and , what was left, of Australian dignity.
    It’s telling that some people despise him for that.

    Cheers.

  67. What Marek said.

    PS @ Leo’s “That’s because the vast majority of ALP voters were simply Howard out voters Jeremy”

    LOL.

  68. What Jeremy said.

  69. I don’t despise Brown. I like him. He is one of the best politicians we have. But on that occasion he behaved immaturely and achieved nothing other than his own embarrassment.

  70. “18 months to go until Fuckwit Fielding disappears into irrelevence. Assuming we don’t get a DD election.”
    Don’t be shocked if this peanut gets back in. He has been steadily chasing the tin hat/redneck vote lately. Add the fundies + Labor prefs and the biggest moron ever to sit in parliament may just scrape back in.

  71. I don’t despise Brown. I like him.

    Fair enough, SB.
    You’ve said so several times over the years and I believe you.

    I don’t think that Brown embarrassed himself.
    If he did, then it was done on purpose so as to get the attention of the international media.

    I think he knew there was a going to be a camera crew in the house, despite it being verboten according to Parliamentary rules. {Apparently, we’re only allowed to see State sanctioned images recorded by the authorised government TeeVee camera!}

    Anyway, he made a goose of himself in order to throw some international light on an appalling situation.
    He didn’t do it for his own glory, but rather, to try and help out two blokes who were left high and dry by their own government.
    In a situation like that, yelling out was the only dignified reaction possible.

    Which begs the question, for who’s sake is Steve Feilding making a goose of himself with this latest prank?

    Cheers

  72. Bob Brown brought attention to the appalling treatment of Australian citizens in Guantanamo Bay (sorry if spelt wrong).

    He achieved plenty – and frankly even if he embarrassed himself (which he didn’t), he doesn’t care. And nor do most of his supporters.

  73. “The vast majority of ALP voters had no idea their preferences were going to fundies first.”

    I agree.

    That’s a sepreate issue as to whether the ALP made it clear though.

    Nobody who was truely interested in the political process could have been in any doubt that their preferences were going to Family First (interesting that you equate family with fundamentalism).
    I do conceed though that the vast majority of ALP voters are political dolts and wouldn’t know if they were voting for Chairman Mao. Opps! That should read they “….didn’t know that they were voting for Chairman Mao”

  74. Hi Rob,

    “Do you mean Kuwait ?

    The coalition never invaded Kuwait, I’m talking about Bush Jnrs Iraq War.”

    Sorry I misunderstood your “biggest war since the last Iraq invasion”, I thought you were referring to the first war against Hussein.

    Marek,

    “Which begs the question, for who’s sake is Steve Feilding making a goose of himself with this latest prank?”

    Fielding is a fool, but I’ve got an uncomfortable feeling that Broken could be right — he might just sneak back in.

    AU

    “He achieved plenty – and frankly even if he embarrassed himself (which he didn’t), he doesn’t care. And nor do most of his supporters.”

    Yes — all 7.8% of them….That the Greens have been around for over 20 years and can still only achieve single digit election results, despite the generations of school leavers in that time who have all had the environmental message hammered into them during their school years, should tell you guys something about Bob Brown’s leadership methods.

    Of course Brown is typical of a party leader who knows he’ll never have to worry about being in power and so will never have to deal with the consequences of what he says, his stance on Iraq and Hussein is a prime example of his hypocrisy and his cherry-picking of the populist view on issues.

  75. Gavin, I don’t think the Greens are all that populist in their policies. If they were, they would try to reflect popular opinion on a range of issues and, being more in touch with the voters, increase their support.

    Perhaps they don’t have a single digit problem, so much as a five digit problem. Their numbers won’t improve until they remove their clenched fist from their clenched sphincter and wash away the shit and blood and mucus of their stinking leftist ideology.

  76. “his cherry-picking of the populist view on issues.”

    No, that’s what the major parties do, in their attempts to be “a broad church”. The Greens are content representing their two constituencies – lefties and environmentalists.

    That their vote has grown to almost double digits, despite a political system which massively benefits the major players – finance, media connections etc, voter ignorance about the preference system so they think they can only effectively vote for a major party – and despite relentless smear campaigns from the corporate media (you know, News Ltd’s regular election year “Bob Brown wants to inject your children with gay heroin and make them marry a tree” garbage), reflects well on them.

    I’d much rather vote for a party that represents me and not the people I disagree with, than one like the ALP and Liberals that pretends to cover all bases and in the end represents no-one but their biggest donors.

  77. That their vote has grown to almost double digits, despite a political system which massively benefits the major players

    Damn right, they’re doing heaps better than that other ‘third party’ what were they called again? The Democrats?

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